News

08Aug 2017

German authorities have carried out several recalls of chicken eggs due to the presence of fipronil in excess of the maximum residue limit. Contaminated eggs come from the Netherlands.
The MRL for fipronil in chicken eggs is set at 0,005 mg/kg via Regulation EC N° 1127/2004 amending Regulation EC N°396/2005.

Fipronil is an anti-tick substance commonly used in insecticidal collars for dogs and cats. It is prohibited in the treatment of food-producing animals, as it is dangerous to the liver, kidneys and thyroid, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

European authorities had notified on 20 July 2017 the presence on the Belgian market of eggs contaminated with fipronil (between 0,0031 and 1,2 mg/kg).
Following this information message, BfR carried out a health risk assessment of the residues of fipronil measured in chicken eggs. This assessment was made on the basis of an acute reference dose (ARfD) exceeding 0,009 mg per kg body weight for fipronil. ARfD is defined as the quantity of a substance per kilogram body weight that can be
ingested with one meal or within one day without any recognisable risk to the consumer.
Calculations were performed with the highest measured value of the levels of fipronil in eggs (1,2 mg of fipronil per kg of eggs). On the basis of this level and the health reference values, the BfR arrives at the following conclusion : ARfD for children is exceeded.
This does not necessarily mean that chicken egg consumption poses a concrete health risk, but it indicates a health risk is possible for children with the required margin of safety after consuming these contaminated chicken eggs.

Please note that your Phytocontrol laboratory is able to perform this analysis within 3 to 5 days. Do not hesitate to contact our regional agencies for your emergencies, we can analyze your samples in 24 hours on request.
For technical information, pricing and/or regulations, please do not hesitate to contact us.

18Jul 2017

OCHRATOXIN A :

Foodstuff

Proposed action limit
Kidneys

4 µg/kg

Fish

5 µg/kg


ERGOT ALKALOIDS
 :

Foodstuff

Proposed action limit
Wheat, rye, oats, spelt

150 µg/kg

Wheat flour, rye flour, oats flour, spelt flour

150 µg/kg
Oat groats

200 µg/kg

Bread

90 µg/kg
Rye bread

90 µg/kg

Biscuits

100 µg/kg
Cereal bars

100 µg/kg

Breakfast cereals

200 µg/kg

Cereal‐based baby foods

80 µg/kg

Wheat pasta

100 µg/kg


TROPANE ALKALOIDS
 :

Foodstuff

Proposed action limit
Cereals (buckwheat, sorghum, millet, maize)

2 µg/kg

Cereal flours

2 µg/kg
Breakfast cereals

3 µg/kg

Infusions

5 µg/kg
Tea

5 µg/kg

Oilseeds (linseed, sunflower, poppy, rapeseed, …)

8 µg/kg
Protein crops (peas, lentils, …)

10 µg/kg

Rusks

2 µg/kg
Maize starch (maïze flour meal, … )

40 µg/kg

Polenta

7 µg/kg

Limit of action : the limit where an action is to be taken.

 

FLAME RETARDANTS :

Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD)

Foodstuff

Proposed action limit
Dairy products (cheese, …)

500 (ng/g fat)

Milk

400 (ng/g fat)
Eggs

3000 (ng/g fat)

Vegetable oils and butter

900 (ng/g fat)
Meat

1000 (ng/g fat)

Meat preparations and meat based products (sausages, ham, …)

1000 (ng/g fat)
Fish oil based food supplements

2000 (ng/g fat)

Food for infants

10 (ng/g wet weight)
Fish

400 (ng/g wet weight)


Polybrominated diphenyl ethers
(PBDE)

Foodstuff

Proposed action limit
Dairy products (cheese, …)

40 (ng/g fat)

Milk

30 (ng/g fat)
Eggs

200 (ng/g fat)

Vegetable oils and butter

60 (ng/g fat)
Meat

80 (ng/g fat)

Meat preparations and meat based products

80 (ng/g fat)
Fish oil based food supplements

100 (ng/g fat)

Food for infants

0,7 (ng/g wet weight)
Fish

30 (ng/g wet weight)


ALKYLPERFLUORINATED COMPOUNDS
 :

Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS)

Foodstuff

Proposed action limit
Meat

50 (µg/kg)

Milk

6 (µg/kg)
Eggs

100 (µg/kg)

Fish

150 (µg/kg)

Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)

Foodstuff

Proposed action limit
Meat

500 (µg/kg)

Milk

60 (µg/kg)
Eggs

1000 (µg/kg)

Fish

1500 (µg/kg)


DIOXINES ET PCB DE TYPE DIOXINES
 :

Foodstuff

Proposed action limit for PCCD/PCDF and PCB‐DL
Honey

1 (pg WHO‐TEQ/g wet weight)

Game meat (including wild rabbit)

10 (pg WHO‐TEQ/g wet weight)
Rabbit meat

3 (pg WHO‐TEQ/g wet weight)


BENZENE
 :

Foodstuff

Proposed action limit
Coffee

500 (µg/kg)

Vegetable oils

1000 (µg/kg)
Smoked fish

500 (µg/kg)

Canned meat products

150 (µg/kg)
Pâté

3000 (µg/kg)

Smoked ham

400 (µg/kg)
Breakfast cereals

200 (µg/kg)

Meat salad

300 (µg/kg)
Fish salad

200 (µg/kg)

Non‐alcoholic beverages

10 (µg/kg)
Vegetable juices

30 (µg/kg)

Flavorings used in the preparation of foodstuffs

30 (µg/kg)

Limit of action : the limit where an action is to be taken.

Know that your laboratory Phytocontrol is able to perform the analysis of certain of these chemicals contaminants.
For technical information, pricing and/or regulations, please do not hesitate to contact us.

07Jul 2017

 

PHYTOCONTROL is pleased to announce you that R&D department has developed a new innovative method of analysis of Mineral Oil, MOSH and MOAH.

Mineral oils (MOH) are complex mixtures derived from crude oil. They consist of hydrocarbons saturated with mineral oil (MOSH) and aromatic hydrocarbons of mineral oil (MOAH).
Mineral oils can be found in food at different stages of food production intentionally (food additives and pesticides) or not (lubricants, cleaning products …).
Printing inks, adhesives, additives and processing aids in paper, cardboard, plastic, but also in jute and sisal bags contain mineral oil. However, cardboard and packaging, especially those made from recycled paper, remain one of the main sources of migration of mineral oils into food.
EFSA considered exposure to MOSH to worrying and exposure to MOAH to particular worrying.
The method was developed to laboratory is performed by LC/GC/FID and allows search MOSH and MOAH C10 to C35 with limits of quantification between 0.2 and 1mg/kg.
Our method allows analysis of following matrices: Wines, Edible oils, Grain products and derivatives, sugars.

DGCCRF conducted a investigation on year 2015 concerning materials and articles intended to come into contact with foodstuffs and compliance with the rules applicable to such products (Regulation (EU) N°10/2011).
Analyzes carried out showed a lot of non-compliance linked to contamination by migration of chemical elements.
Please note that our laboratory is already working on development of methods for detection of mineral oils, phthalates and bisphenol in food packaging.

For technical information, pricing and / or regulations, please contact us:

Contact your local agency

30Jun 2017

Phytocontrol is pleased to announce our new success with the German test “QS”.
The goal of this interlaboratory test is to detect and quantify several active ingredients in 48 hours.
This test has very strict criteria since all the following conditions should be met to pass the QS :
– All the molecules must be identified,
– No false positives are tolerated,
– The quantification must be between 70 and 120% of the doping level.
The success of this German ring test confirms again our specific know-how and our reliability in the results in the best timeline.

Certificat QS – Spring 2017

Do not hesitate to contact us for any further information.

26Jun 2017

From 1 July 2017, processed animal protein derived from insects and compound feed containing such processed animal protein shall be authorized for feeding aquaculture animals via Regulation (EU ) 2017/893 of 24 May 2017.

In view of EFSA opinion of 8 October 2015, the following insect species meet the safety requirements for production of insects for use in feed:

– Black Soldier Fly (Hermetia illucens)
– Common Housefly (Musca domestica)
– Yellow Mealworm (Tenebrio molitor)
– Lesser Mealworm (Alphitobius diaperinus)
– House cricket (Acheta domesticus)
– Banded cricket (Gryllodes sigillatus)
– Field Cricket (Gryllus assimilis)
The insects are fed on substrates that do not harbour material of ruminant or human (manure) origin.

The substrate for the feeding of insects may only contain products of non-animal origin or the following products of animal origin of Category 3 material:
— fishmeal
— blood products from non-ruminants
— di and tricalcium phosphate of animal origin
— hydrolysed proteins from non-ruminants
— hydrolysed proteins from hides and skins of ruminants
— gelatine and collagen from non-ruminants
— eggs and egg products
— milk, milk based-products, milk-derived products and colostrum
— honey
— rendered fats

These products will be subject to provisions of Directive 2002/32, which sets out in Annex I maximum levels of undesirable substances for feed.
Processed animal proteins derived from insects are raw materials, maximum levels for feed materials shall apply.
Similarly, compound feed containing insect flour shall be subject to the maximum levels applicable to compound feed.
Know that your laboratory PHYTOCONTROL is able to analyze substances regulated in directive 2002/32.
For technical information, pricing and/or regulations, please contact us.

15Jun 2017

 

Regulation (EU) 2017/983 was published on 10 June 2017.
This regulation amends maximum residue limits for tricyclazole in or on certain products.
The main change concerns MRL on rice which increases from 1mg/kg to 0.01mg/kg.

Given long-term preservation of rice, Regulation provides transitional provisions for rice produced in or before 2016, to allow normal marketing, processing and consumption of rice. Given uncertainties regarding properties of tricyclazole, deadlines provided for regulation do not allow any treatment with tricyclazole in 2017 or later.
The same applies to basmati rice, maturation before placing on market is specific. Provision should be made for this type of rice, if it was grown in 2016 or earlier, an additional period of six months prior to the implementation of the amended MRLs for this type of rice, to permit the normal marketing, processing and consumption of basmati rice.

This new regulation applies from 30 June 2017 to all products except basmati rice.
It applies to Basmati rice only from 30 December 2017.
Know that your laboratory PHYTOCONTROL is able to achieve these four parameters.
For technical information, pricing and/or regulations, please contact us.

13Jun 2017

 

According to EFSA opinion of October 2015, ethoxyquin additive is considered a powerful antioxidant in feed.
However, absence of adverse effects of ethoxyquin could not be established on basis of information and documents provided.
On the other hand, absence of genotoxicity of one of its metabolites ethoxyquin quinoneimine could not be demonstrated and p-phenetidine, an impurity of this additive, is recognized as a possible mutagenic agent.

Accordingly, Implementing Regulation (EU) No 2017/962 published on 8 June 2017 suspends authorization of ethoxyquin as an additive for feeding all species and categories of animals.
This Regulation shall apply from 28 June 2017.

Transitional measures have been put in place:
– Existing stocks of ethoxyquine additive and premixtures containing this additive may continue to be placed on the market until 28 September 2017 and may be used until 28 December 2017.
– Feed materials and compound feedingstuffs produced with the ethoxyquine additive or premixtures containing this additive may continue to be placed on the market until 28 December 2017 and may be used until 28 March 2018 .

Specific transitional measures:
– (a) The ethoxyquin additive and premixtures containing this additive which are to be incorporated into the raw materials referred to in entry 7.1.2 (Dried seaweeds) and Chapter 10 (Fish, other aquatic animals and Catalog products Of raw materials established by Commission Regulation (EU) No 68/2013 (in PJ) may continue to be placed on the market until 30 September 2019 (and used up to three months thereafter) to Condition that the label of the ethoxymic additive or premixtures containing this additive mentions anticipated incorporation into these raw materials.
– (b) Raw materials for foods referred to in subparagraph (a) produced with the ethoxyquin additive or premixtures containing the additive may continue to be placed on the market until 31 December 2019 (and used up to 3 months later).

-(c) The compound feedingstuffs produced with the raw materials referred to in (b) may continue to be placed on the market until 31 March 2020 (and used up to 3 months thereafter)

Other specific transitional measures:
– (a) the ethoxyquin additive to be incorporated into the following additive preparations authorized in the Union in accordance with Regulation (EC) No 1831/2003 may continue to be placed on the market until 31 March 2018 (and used until ‘ To the 3rd month), provided that the label of the ethoxyquin additive mentions incorporation into these additive preparations (preparations of vitamin A, D, E, K, lutein, zeaxanthin, ethyl-Beta-apo-8’- Carotenic, citranaxanthin, capsanthin, astaxanthin, astaxanthin dimethyl disuccinate, canthaxanthin, beta-carotene).
– (b) preparations of additives referred to in paragraph (a) containing the ethoxyquin additive and premixtures containing such additive preparations may continue to be placed on the market until 30 June 2018 (and used until 30 June 2018) 3 months later).
– (c) Feed materials and compound feedingstuffs containing the products referred to in (b) may continue to be placed on the market until 30 September 2018 (and used up to 3 months thereafter).

Phytocontrol is able to look for ethoxyquin in animal feed.
We invite you to contact your regional agency for more details.

30May 2017

 

European Commission has published its 2016 annual report on food fraud.

172 cases of food fraud have been documented, including 161 about human food and 11 about feed.

The majority of fraud concerns:
– Labeling errors on composition (42 cases)
– Substitution of an ingredient (11 cases)
– Addition of undeclared substance (9 cases)

The products most affected by food fraud are:
– Meat and meat products (28 cases)
– Fish and fish products (22 cases)
– Oils and fats (20 cases)

We invite you to consult full report via link below:
https://ec.europa.eu/food/sites/food/files/safety/docs/food-fraud_network_activity_report_2016.pdf

Phytocontrol brings you its expertise in research of allergens, nutritional analysis according to INCO regulations, or authentication of animal or plant species.
We invite you to contact your regional agency for more details.

20Apr 2017

photo actu efsa 2015

 

EFSA published its report for the year 2015 on pesticide residues in food.
A total of 84341 samples were analyzed and 774 pesticides and metabolites were searched.
97.2% of samples tested in 2015 under the European Program for Monitoring of Food Pesticides are found to comply with MRLs, 53.3% free of quantifiable residues and 43.9% containing residues complying with MRLs. The overall compliance rate remains similar to the previous year for which the compliance rate was 97.1%.
As part of the European Coordinated Control Program 2015 (EUCP), 11 matrices were analyzed: Eggplants, Bananas, Broccoli, Virgin olive oil, Orange juice, Peas, Peppers, Table grapes, Wheat, Butter and . 10884 samples were analyzed and 164 pesticides were searched. 0.8% of the samples exceeded the MRLs (89 samples), 38.1% had residues below MRLs (4145) and 61.1% of the samples (6,650 samples) had residues below the limit of quantification .
Eggplants:
The MRL was exceeded for 4 pesticides: acetamiprid (a sample from Spain), bitertanol (a sample from Romania), methomyl (a sample from Spain) and dicloran (a sample from Italy).
Bananas:
The MRL was exceeded for four pesticides: imazalil (in a sample from Côte d’Ivoire), endosulfan (a sample from Portugal), chlorpyrifos-methyl (a sample from Spain), fludioxonil (a sample from Guadeloupe).
Broccoli:
The MRL was exceeded mainly for dithiocarbamates (24 samples mainly from Poland and Spain) and chlorpyrifos (6 samples from Poland, Greece, Austria and Romania). It should be noted that the residues of CS2 are not only related to the use of pesticides belonging to the group of dithiocarbamates but also come from natural compounds that mimic the presence of dithiocarbamates. This is particularly the case for brassica vegetables, such as broccoli which naturally contain CS2 precursor compounds.
Olive oil :
The MRL was exceeded for fenthion (1 sample).
Orange juice :
The most frequently found pesticides were imazalil (quantified in 10.6% of the samples tested), thiabendazole (4.3%) and carbendazim (2.5%).
For a sample containing abamectin residues, the reporting country (Belgium) identified an MRL exceeding (0.1%) by comparing the residue level measured in the juice (0.012 mg / kg) with the MRL established for Unconverted oranges (0.01 mg / kg).
Peas:
The MRL was exceeded for 5 pesticides, most commonly for carbendazim (Belgium and unknown origin).
Pepper :
Exceedances of MRLs were noted for diniconazole, propargite, azinphos-methyl and fenthion.
Table Grapes:
The MRL was exceeded mainly for ethephon (6 samples: 2 from Cyprus, 1 from Egypt, 1 from Greece, 1 from Namibia, 1 from Peru) and tebuconazole (4 samples: 2 from Cyprus and 2 from Turkey) .
Wheat :
The MRL was exceeded most often for imidacloprid (2 samples from Romania).
Butter :
No MRL exceeded was identified for these samples.
Egg:
The MRL was exceeded for DDT and Bifenthrin (2 samples)

In general, the most non-compliant matrices (EUCP program and national programs combined) are:
For unprocessed products:
– Table olives (34.5%)
– Passion fruit (21.3%)
– The leaves of celery (20.9%)
– Tea (18.5%)
For processed products:
– Wild mushrooms (22.6%)
– Vine leaves (19%)
– Laurel leaves (16.7%)
– Peppers (12.5%)

Full details of this 2015 report can be found at the link below:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.2903/j.efsa.2017.4791/epdf