News

26Jun 2017

From 1 July 2017, processed animal protein derived from insects and compound feed containing such processed animal protein shall be authorized for feeding aquaculture animals via Regulation (EU ) 2017/893 of 24 May 2017.

In view of EFSA opinion of 8 October 2015, the following insect species meet the safety requirements for production of insects for use in feed:

– Black Soldier Fly (Hermetia illucens)
– Common Housefly (Musca domestica)
– Yellow Mealworm (Tenebrio molitor)
– Lesser Mealworm (Alphitobius diaperinus)
– House cricket (Acheta domesticus)
– Banded cricket (Gryllodes sigillatus)
– Field Cricket (Gryllus assimilis)
The insects are fed on substrates that do not harbour material of ruminant or human (manure) origin.

The substrate for the feeding of insects may only contain products of non-animal origin or the following products of animal origin of Category 3 material:
— fishmeal
— blood products from non-ruminants
— di and tricalcium phosphate of animal origin
— hydrolysed proteins from non-ruminants
— hydrolysed proteins from hides and skins of ruminants
— gelatine and collagen from non-ruminants
— eggs and egg products
— milk, milk based-products, milk-derived products and colostrum
— honey
— rendered fats

These products will be subject to provisions of Directive 2002/32, which sets out in Annex I maximum levels of undesirable substances for feed.
Processed animal proteins derived from insects are raw materials, maximum levels for feed materials shall apply.
Similarly, compound feed containing insect flour shall be subject to the maximum levels applicable to compound feed.
Know that your laboratory PHYTOCONTROL is able to analyze substances regulated in directive 2002/32.
For technical information, pricing and/or regulations, please contact us.

15Jun 2017

 

Regulation (EU) 2017/983 was published on 10 June 2017.
This regulation amends maximum residue limits for tricyclazole in or on certain products.
The main change concerns MRL on rice which increases from 1mg/kg to 0.01mg/kg.

Given long-term preservation of rice, Regulation provides transitional provisions for rice produced in or before 2016, to allow normal marketing, processing and consumption of rice. Given uncertainties regarding properties of tricyclazole, deadlines provided for regulation do not allow any treatment with tricyclazole in 2017 or later.
The same applies to basmati rice, maturation before placing on market is specific. Provision should be made for this type of rice, if it was grown in 2016 or earlier, an additional period of six months prior to the implementation of the amended MRLs for this type of rice, to permit the normal marketing, processing and consumption of basmati rice.

This new regulation applies from 30 June 2017 to all products except basmati rice.
It applies to Basmati rice only from 30 December 2017.
Know that your laboratory PHYTOCONTROL is able to achieve these four parameters.
For technical information, pricing and/or regulations, please contact us.

13Jun 2017

 

According to EFSA opinion of October 2015, ethoxyquin additive is considered a powerful antioxidant in feed.
However, absence of adverse effects of ethoxyquin could not be established on basis of information and documents provided.
On the other hand, absence of genotoxicity of one of its metabolites ethoxyquin quinoneimine could not be demonstrated and p-phenetidine, an impurity of this additive, is recognized as a possible mutagenic agent.

Accordingly, Implementing Regulation (EU) No 2017/962 published on 8 June 2017 suspends authorization of ethoxyquin as an additive for feeding all species and categories of animals.
This Regulation shall apply from 28 June 2017.

Transitional measures have been put in place:
– Existing stocks of ethoxyquine additive and premixtures containing this additive may continue to be placed on the market until 28 September 2017 and may be used until 28 December 2017.
– Feed materials and compound feedingstuffs produced with the ethoxyquine additive or premixtures containing this additive may continue to be placed on the market until 28 December 2017 and may be used until 28 March 2018 .

Specific transitional measures:
– (a) The ethoxyquin additive and premixtures containing this additive which are to be incorporated into the raw materials referred to in entry 7.1.2 (Dried seaweeds) and Chapter 10 (Fish, other aquatic animals and Catalog products Of raw materials established by Commission Regulation (EU) No 68/2013 (in PJ) may continue to be placed on the market until 30 September 2019 (and used up to three months thereafter) to Condition that the label of the ethoxymic additive or premixtures containing this additive mentions anticipated incorporation into these raw materials.
– (b) Raw materials for foods referred to in subparagraph (a) produced with the ethoxyquin additive or premixtures containing the additive may continue to be placed on the market until 31 December 2019 (and used up to 3 months later).

-(c) The compound feedingstuffs produced with the raw materials referred to in (b) may continue to be placed on the market until 31 March 2020 (and used up to 3 months thereafter)

Other specific transitional measures:
– (a) the ethoxyquin additive to be incorporated into the following additive preparations authorized in the Union in accordance with Regulation (EC) No 1831/2003 may continue to be placed on the market until 31 March 2018 (and used until ‘ To the 3rd month), provided that the label of the ethoxyquin additive mentions incorporation into these additive preparations (preparations of vitamin A, D, E, K, lutein, zeaxanthin, ethyl-Beta-apo-8’- Carotenic, citranaxanthin, capsanthin, astaxanthin, astaxanthin dimethyl disuccinate, canthaxanthin, beta-carotene).
– (b) preparations of additives referred to in paragraph (a) containing the ethoxyquin additive and premixtures containing such additive preparations may continue to be placed on the market until 30 June 2018 (and used until 30 June 2018) 3 months later).
– (c) Feed materials and compound feedingstuffs containing the products referred to in (b) may continue to be placed on the market until 30 September 2018 (and used up to 3 months thereafter).

Phytocontrol is able to look for ethoxyquin in animal feed.
We invite you to contact your regional agency for more details.

30May 2017

 

European Commission has published its 2016 annual report on food fraud.

172 cases of food fraud have been documented, including 161 about human food and 11 about feed.

The majority of fraud concerns:
– Labeling errors on composition (42 cases)
– Substitution of an ingredient (11 cases)
– Addition of undeclared substance (9 cases)

The products most affected by food fraud are:
– Meat and meat products (28 cases)
– Fish and fish products (22 cases)
– Oils and fats (20 cases)

We invite you to consult full report via link below:
https://ec.europa.eu/food/sites/food/files/safety/docs/food-fraud_network_activity_report_2016.pdf

Phytocontrol brings you its expertise in research of allergens, nutritional analysis according to INCO regulations, or authentication of animal or plant species.
We invite you to contact your regional agency for more details.

20Apr 2017

photo actu efsa 2015

 

EFSA published its report for the year 2015 on pesticide residues in food.
A total of 84341 samples were analyzed and 774 pesticides and metabolites were searched.
97.2% of samples tested in 2015 under the European Program for Monitoring of Food Pesticides are found to comply with MRLs, 53.3% free of quantifiable residues and 43.9% containing residues complying with MRLs. The overall compliance rate remains similar to the previous year for which the compliance rate was 97.1%.
As part of the European Coordinated Control Program 2015 (EUCP), 11 matrices were analyzed: Eggplants, Bananas, Broccoli, Virgin olive oil, Orange juice, Peas, Peppers, Table grapes, Wheat, Butter and . 10884 samples were analyzed and 164 pesticides were searched. 0.8% of the samples exceeded the MRLs (89 samples), 38.1% had residues below MRLs (4145) and 61.1% of the samples (6,650 samples) had residues below the limit of quantification .
Eggplants:
The MRL was exceeded for 4 pesticides: acetamiprid (a sample from Spain), bitertanol (a sample from Romania), methomyl (a sample from Spain) and dicloran (a sample from Italy).
Bananas:
The MRL was exceeded for four pesticides: imazalil (in a sample from Côte d’Ivoire), endosulfan (a sample from Portugal), chlorpyrifos-methyl (a sample from Spain), fludioxonil (a sample from Guadeloupe).
Broccoli:
The MRL was exceeded mainly for dithiocarbamates (24 samples mainly from Poland and Spain) and chlorpyrifos (6 samples from Poland, Greece, Austria and Romania). It should be noted that the residues of CS2 are not only related to the use of pesticides belonging to the group of dithiocarbamates but also come from natural compounds that mimic the presence of dithiocarbamates. This is particularly the case for brassica vegetables, such as broccoli which naturally contain CS2 precursor compounds.
Olive oil :
The MRL was exceeded for fenthion (1 sample).
Orange juice :
The most frequently found pesticides were imazalil (quantified in 10.6% of the samples tested), thiabendazole (4.3%) and carbendazim (2.5%).
For a sample containing abamectin residues, the reporting country (Belgium) identified an MRL exceeding (0.1%) by comparing the residue level measured in the juice (0.012 mg / kg) with the MRL established for Unconverted oranges (0.01 mg / kg).
Peas:
The MRL was exceeded for 5 pesticides, most commonly for carbendazim (Belgium and unknown origin).
Pepper :
Exceedances of MRLs were noted for diniconazole, propargite, azinphos-methyl and fenthion.
Table Grapes:
The MRL was exceeded mainly for ethephon (6 samples: 2 from Cyprus, 1 from Egypt, 1 from Greece, 1 from Namibia, 1 from Peru) and tebuconazole (4 samples: 2 from Cyprus and 2 from Turkey) .
Wheat :
The MRL was exceeded most often for imidacloprid (2 samples from Romania).
Butter :
No MRL exceeded was identified for these samples.
Egg:
The MRL was exceeded for DDT and Bifenthrin (2 samples)

In general, the most non-compliant matrices (EUCP program and national programs combined) are:
For unprocessed products:
– Table olives (34.5%)
– Passion fruit (21.3%)
– The leaves of celery (20.9%)
– Tea (18.5%)
For processed products:
– Wild mushrooms (22.6%)
– Vine leaves (19%)
– Laurel leaves (16.7%)
– Peppers (12.5%)

Full details of this 2015 report can be found at the link below:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.2903/j.efsa.2017.4791/epdf

16Mar 2017

In cosmetics 2017

Phytocontrol Laboratory will be present on April, 4th, 5th and 6th in the In Cosmetics February show in London. Meet 800 suppliers in just 3 days!

Discover the latest ingredients and emerging technologies. Find new formulations to optimise your products. Attend a unique educational programme on market trends, regulations, formulation, and scientific advances.

So we invite you to come and visit us on Stand D56 in the French hall!

In-cosmetics Global

ExCel London – One Western Gateway

Royal Victoria Dock – London

13Mar 2017

Image actu - Interdiction PBO

Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) is a synergist used in numerous pesticides. Synergists are chemical products that do not have a pesticide effect but improve the pesticide properties of other chemical products. PBO can be added to phytosanitary compositions containing pyrethrins or more generally compounds of the pyrethroid family. After ingestion by insects, PBO inhibits the secretion of certain enzymes and potentiates the insecticide properties of the phytosanitary product. PBO has harmful effects on human endocrine functions and on the environment.

Click here to see the ANSES (French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety) opinion from July 2013 on setting maximum residue limits (MRLs) for piperonyl butoxide in plants

According to the ITAB (French Research Institute for Organic Farming) guide on inputs (Instructions to the guide – September 2016), products containing PBO will be banned in organic farming according to the following timeline:

  • Removal of “AB” (organic farming) from the labels of affected products for sale and in distribution on 31 March 2017
  • Remaining stock to be used by 30 September 2017

Click below to see the lists of plant protection products and basic substances authorised in organic farming in France:

ITAB’s website will publish a new version of the guide to plant protection products authorised in organic farming in France. Products containing PBO will be removed from the list on 30 September 2017. Until then, they will be marked with an asterisk in the guide.

03Mar 2017

Image actu V2

Definition

The World Health Organization defines an endocrine disruptor (EDC) as “an exogenous substance or mixture that alters function(s) of the endocrine system and consequently causes adverse health effects in an intact organism, or its progeny, or (sub)populations. A potential endocrine disruptor is an exogenous substance or mixture that possesses properties that might be expected to lead to endocrine disruption in an intact organism, or its progeny, or (sub)populations.”

Origin

In general, EDCs are naturally-occurring (hormones), medical (contraceptives) or synthetic (industrial products) chemical substances that are found in common consumer products, agricultural treatments and cosmetics and can interfere with human endocrine gland function.

According to a report by ANSES (French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety; updated on 22/05/2014), EDCs can have various effects on the body, including:

  • Mimicking the action of a natural hormone and thus eliciting the response caused by the hormone
  • Preventing a hormone from binding and thus from transmitting its signal
  • Disrupting the production or control of hormones or hormone receptors.

At present, suspected substances include pesticides, bisphenol A, phthalates and brominated compounds.

Current legislation

Various European authorities are working with member states to try to identify relevant criteria for classifying these substances. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has put in place protocols for detecting effects related to endocrine disruptors. European legislation does not currently include a universally accepted definition or criteria.

Phytocontrol’s expertise

Our laboratory can determine the concentrations of the following substances in food matrices and/or in water:

  • pesticide residues (biocides, phytopharmaceuticals, synthetic pyrethroids): several dozen active materials currently tested by Phytocontrol are suspected of being endocrine disruptors
  • chlordecone, ethylene thiourea
  • bisphenol A, 4-nonylphenol
  • acrylamide
  • ortho-phenylphenol (OPP)
  • heavy metals and organotin compounds
  • mycotoxins
  • phthalates
  • HAPs
  • dioxins
  • PCB
  • furans
  • veterinary residues
20Feb 2017

SITE-Ouverture_BTS-CHIMIE

The Phytocontrol laboratory, in partnership with the CFA Languedoc-Roussillon based in Marguerittes, is delighted to announce the opening of the new BTS Métiers de la chemie en alternance in early September 2017.

See the BTS brochure

For more information about the training, you can contact the CFA Languedoc-Roussillon based in Marguerittes (France) on 04 66 87 97 59.